Why Local DOES make a difference.

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Why Local DOES make a difference.

Everyday applications for local mathematics.

You’ve heard it before. Probably a million times. You see signs for it everywhere around our unique entrepreneurial city. And, compared to other places I’ve lived, the people of Asheville DO practice what they preach. Yet with another regime change and unanswered questions about our futures, I couldn’t help but re-explore ways to empower my community and ensure that I am doing what I can to create the future that I want for my kids-and yours. So, here comes the question again: how much does how I vote with my money count? Because money has become the deciding factor for many on how we expropriate our natural resources. For better or worse it IS the societal norm for daily necessities. It keeps the doors of this market open. It keeps the refrigerators running. And thanks to a connection from the Asheville Grown folks, I found ILSR-the Institute for Local Self Reliance and some very validating information. For instance:
“On a dollar-for-dollar basis, the local economic impact of independently owned businesses is significantly greater than that of national chains, this study concludes. Analyzing data collected from 28 locally owned retail businesses in Portland, Maine, along with corporate filings for a representative national chain, the researchers found that every $100 spent at locally owned businesses contributes an additional $58 to the local economy. By comparison, $100 spent at a chain store in Portland yields just $33 in local economic impact. The study concludes that, if residents of the region were to shift 10 percent of their spending from chains to locally owned businesses, it would generate $127 million in additional local economic activity and 874 new jobs.”
Or this fact from the Civic Economics Empty Storefronts website:
“In 2015, Amazon sold $55.6 billion worth of retail goods nationwide, all while avoiding $704 million in sales taxes.  The cost of lost sales taxes falls equally on state and local governments.” They also feature some very telling maps of gaps in sales tax returns-they almost mirror election return maps.
See where I’m going here?
We all have reason to feel insecure both now and before the election. But loving, compassionate cities come from open hearts and willing participants. And strong communities come from empowered local organizations that need your love and truly love you back.
Thanks for caring! Let’s build our dreams together shall we?
Karina
West Village Market


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